Burntcoat Head

Burntcoat Head Nova Scotia, this was a crazy place for sure and one great stop for our crew…A little background on the location.

Like pretty much every place along the ocean around the world, Burntcoat Head experiences two high tides and two low tides each day. The Bay of Fundy fills and empties with approximately 160 billion tonnes of water twice a day. On average it takes 6 hours and 13 minutes between high and low tide. As soon as the tide has reached its lowest or highest point it will change directions and either begin to come to shore or flow back out. Each day the tides times will change approximately by one hour. The reason why the tides fill’s and empties the Bay of Fundy each day is due to gravitational pull of the moon and the sun on the earth, as well as earth’s rotation. The tide gauge at Burntcoat Head was operated by the Canadian Hydrographic Service and has recorded the highest tidal range in the world. Currently, the tidal gauge is no longer in operation. Tides at Burntcoat Head average 55.8 ft, with the highest being set during the 1869 Saxby Gale at 70.9 ft.

The personal experience was surreal, walking unto the ocean floor at low tide was CRAZY, hard to explain, hard to capture a picture to establish the scale of this location, and overwhelming for sure. The first visit, captured above, was on a rainy gloomy day, but we still had to explore…that’s what we do. We did happen to have a second visit with a pop of color, more of those later. The picture below is one I enlarged a bit from the first one, an actually circled a fellow NxNW photographer, welcome to the scale of Burntcoat Head Nova Scotia! Walking on the Ocean floor

Thanks for stopping!

This entry was posted in Landscape and Architecture, Nova Scotia, NXNW2019 and tagged , , , , , , , , , , .

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